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Here’s How You Can Address Adderall Withdrawal

I know I shouldn’t be doing this, but I really need Adderall to get this work done.

Who do I know that can give me some?

This is the last time I’m doing this.

Can I even fix this?

This can be fixed, and you can live a life free from Adderall.

Adderall, also known as the “study drug,” has become quite popular over the years.

This stimulant is misused by people from all walks of life, from younger students to those well into their careers.

What many don’t realize is that Adderall misuse can result in addiction and pose health risks. In some cases, they may need to address Adderall misuse and addiction with professional treatment.

For some, one of the first steps in that process is a medically supervised withdrawal.

This blog will examine Adderall withdrawal, Adderall addiction treatment, and more.

What Is Adderall?

Adderall is a stimulant drug that is prescribed for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy (uncontrollable episodes of deep sleep).

ADHD symptoms include:

  • Difficulty paying attention
  • Overactivity
  • Interrupting people
  • Organizational problems
  • Constantly moving around
  • Unable to stop moving around

Symptoms of narcolepsy are:

  • Excessive sleepiness throughout the day
  • Hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that aren’t there)
  • Loss of muscle control

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, “Adderall is used to treat ADHD in adults and children 3 years of age and older. Adderall XR is used to treat ADHD in adults and children 6 years of age and older.”

Dextroamphetamine and amphetamine (Adderall) is also used to treat narcolepsy (a sleep disorder that causes excessive daytime sleepiness and sudden attacks of sleep) in adults and children 12 years of age and older. The combination of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine is in a class of medications called central nervous system stimulants. It works by changing the amounts of certain natural substances in the brain.”

Adderall increases the activity of two brain chemicals: dopamine (a feel-good chemical) and norepinephrine (works with adrenaline to give the body sudden energy in times of stress). By consuming Adderall, people may feel more energized and have a sense of euphoria (great happiness).

Adderall is currently only prescribed to treat ADHD and narcolepsy, which means consuming it for other purposes, without a prescription, or at a higher dosage than prescribed is considered misuse.

As previously mentioned, some younger folks may misuse Adderall to try to achieve better grades (hence the name “study drug”), while older people may misuse it with the intention of enhancing their work performance.

Just as people can become addicted to many drugs, those who consume Adderall may become dependent on its effects.

Adderall Withdrawal: The Problem and Solution

Prescription stimulants, like other drugs, can cause withdrawal if you have misused the drug and suddenly stop.

Sometimes, withdrawal symptoms can be uncomfortable for the person battling the addiction.

While Adderall may not be physically addictive in itself, the brain may end up relying on the drug to regulate dopamine and norepinephrine, resulting in the brain having trouble doing so on its own. This can lead to things like cravings.

Adderall withdrawal symptoms include, but are not limited to:

  • Fatigue
  • Insomnia
  • Depression

Adderall withdrawal can be treated, and the process can be made more comfortable for the person with the addiction at a professional detox facility.

Detox is typically the first step on one’s road to recovery. Medically supervised detoxes are often considered the safest way to halt a substance use disorder. Through the detox process, medical professionals can monitor progress and vitals, and if needed, medication can be used to manage withdrawal symptoms.

The detox process will ultimately rid the body of the substance. During the process, patients will typically consume a healthy diet, take vitamins, and rest.

Once the detox process has been completed, medical professionals will usually evaluate a client and transition them into therapy.

What Is a Treatment Center Like?

One of the most important aspects of the detox process is finding a treatment center that has your best interest in mind.

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Treatment centers with evidence-based practices tend to help ensure each individual receives the proper care they need.

Examples of evidence-based treatment include dialectical behavior therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Inpatient treatment, also known as residential treatment, will use various treatment methods and therapies, such as those mentioned above, to improve quality of life. The right treatment facility will understand that each individual is different, meaning a one-size-fits-all approach doesn’t work for everyone.

If you’re seeking addiction treatment for something such as Adderall, you can expect a variety of healthcare professionals to help you along the way.

Inpatient addiction treatment programs typically last around a month. However, some programs can run longer.

With inpatient treatment, you can expect:

  • Focusing on your needs
  • Connecting with others in recovery
  • Healthy lifestyles
  • No drugs or alcohol
  • Structure
  • Safe environment
  • Focusing on individual needs and the self
  • Learn recovery tools
  • Around the clock care and supervision

Am I Addicted to Adderall?

A key step in addressing your addiction is realizing you actually have one.

While this can be a stressful or difficult thing to accept, it is indeed a major leap on your road to recovery. As is the case with most stimulant substance use disorders, Adderall is consumed for typically one or two reasons: to feel a sense of euphoria, or to feel more energized and focused.

When you become too reliant on Adderall, developing an addiction is possible.

Since Adderall comes in tablet form, sometimes those who misuse it will crush it and either snort or smoke the powder.

You may be dealing with an addiction if you are:

  • Having financial troubles due to buying Adderall
  • Taking Adderall without a prescription
  • Needing Adderall to complete work
  • Having difficulties with relationships due to Adderall
  • Taking on more projects than you can manage

Not everyone reacts to Adderall the same way, which is why it’s crucial that you only consume it under a doctor’s supervision.

Adderall can cause:

  • Increased body temperature
  • Seizures
  • Anger
  • Muscle pain
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Reduced blood flow
  • Paranoia (fear someone wants to hurt you)

Can You Overdose on Adderall?

Yes, it is possible to overdose on Adderall.

According to the National Institutes of Health, “An overdose occurs when the person uses enough of the drug to produce a life-threatening reaction or death.”

A prescription stimulant overdose typically results in tremors, restlessness, fever, rapid breathing, hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that aren’t there), panic, weakness, and muscle pains.

Overdoses can also cause heart problems such as an irregular heartbeat or heart attack, seizures, blood pressure problems, and more.

If you believe you or someone you know has overdosed on a prescription stimulant like Adderall, call 911 immediately.

Adderall Is For Prescription Use Only

As discussed earlier, Adderall is currently only prescribed for ADHD and narcolepsy. When Adderall is taken without a prescription or when it’s used for non-medical purposes, this is classified as misuse.

In 2018, it was reported that 5 million American adults misused a prescription stimulant such as Adderall.

The National Institutes of Health mentions, “Long-term use of stimulants, even as prescribed by a doctor, can cause a person to develop a tolerance, which means that he or she needs higher and/or more frequent doses of the drug to get the desired effects.”

Medical professionals also should know what other medications you’re taking as Adderall can interact with them. For example, taking too much Adderall along with antidepressants can cause serotonin syndrome, which occurs when the body produces too much serotonin.

In addition to misusing Adderall for its euphoric effects and to increase productivity at school or work, others may misuse it to lose weight. This can also be dangerous.

Since Adderall can suppress appetite by causing the brain to tell the body it’s full when it isn’t, you’re putting yourself at risk for malnourishment. Starving yourself also isn’t a healthy way to lose weight in its own regard.

Adderall is also illegal to purchase without a prescription. It’s possible to find yourself facing fines and jail time since it’s a Schedule II controlled substance.

Professional Treatment Can Help

Overcoming your addiction can be difficult when you’re surrounded by stressors at home.

By seeking treatment in a peaceful and structured environment, you can conquer your addiction.

Treatment facilities can also make the detox process more comfortable, providing a smoother transition into therapy.

With treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy (a focus on solution-based thinking) and dialectical behavior therapy (a type of cognitive behavioral therapy focused on helping clients deal with emotions and conflict in their relationships), you can beat your addiction.

Remember, there is no shame in seeking treatment.

Seeking Treatment at Vertava Health Ohio

Here at Vertava Health Ohio, we understand your situation is unique, which is why we create treatment plans just for you.

We will provide the perfect retreat to get you started on your road to recovery.

Our inpatient rehab program will address symptoms of your addiction as well as any unique factors that may affect it.

Here, we use evidence-based treatments like cognitive behavioral therapy and dialectical behavior therapy to help change thoughts and behavior that leads to unwanted or unhealthy habits.

Take the first step today. To learn more, call (888) 481-5073.

FAQs

How long does it take to recover from Adderall addiction?

Everyone is different. There are various factors that come into play when recovering from an Adderall addiction, such as how long you’ve misused the drug and the type of treatment you receive. It’s important to remember that seeking professional medical treatment is often the safest route to take if you’re trying to overcome an Adderall addiction. Treatment centers with evidence-based practices tend to help ensure each individual receives the proper care they need. Examples of evidence-based treatment include dialectical behavior therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy.

Do Adderall side effects go away?

Adderall side effects should go away when you stop taking the drug, but if they don’t, tell your doctor. Side effects include headache, nervousness, constipation, dry mouth, weight loss, diarrhea, and nausea. If you are having more severe side effects, tell your doctor immediately. These symptoms include dizziness, seizures, troubles with speech, depression, numbness, hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that aren’t there), and blurred vision.

What happens to your body on Adderall?

Adderall increases the activity of two brain chemicals: dopamine (a feel-good chemical) and norepinephrine (works with adrenaline to give the body sudden energy in times of stress). By consuming Adderall, people may feel more energized and have a sense of euphoria (great happiness). Those who misuse Adderall may become dependent on its effects. Adderall may not be physically addictive, but the brain itself may end up relying on the drug to regulate dopamine and norepinephrine, resulting in the brain having trouble doing so on its own.

What happens to your brain when you stop taking Adderall?

Since the brain has become reliant on Adderall to regulate chemicals such as dopamine, when you stop taking the drug, it can be difficult for the brain to produce it on its own. This can lead to Adderall cravings.